• Blog

We are a busy bunch here at Compete PR, and love to talk. On this note, please find some of our latest musings below.

23rd Jun 2014

The Avenger Triathlon - when a race doesn't go quite your way...




Kate took part in The Avenger Triathlon this weekend, but things didn't go quite according to plan...


Following a string of good performances this year, I was excited about going into the The Avenger Triathlon (www.raceways.eu). My training had been going well, and I was feeling strong and confident. However, two days before the race I felt a little out of sorts, but decided to simply write it off as pre-race nerves. Unfortunately, this was not the case, and it was in fact the early stages of 'lurgy', which, I would later find out, would see me DNFing in pretty spectacular style...

Swim - The Avenger Swim course was three laps of approximately 800m. When the claxon sounded I found it pretty easy to get into a rhythm and find my stroke. Waves of nausea hit me periodically, but on the whole I felt strong, in control and could see I had settled towards the front of the pack. Leaving the water, there was a 100m run up to T1 and I found out I was in 3rd place, and I was able to overtake 2nd place in T1, learning that the leading lady was 45 seconds up the road. 

Bike - I knew as soon as i started out that the race was going to be a struggle. My stomach felt like it was 'plummelling', and my legs didn't have the power in them that normally rely on in a race. I settled my legs into a high cadence spin and was able to overtake the leading lady within a few minutes. But despite this, I felt pants. I felt sick going up the hills, wobbly on the descents and just couldn't get into my rhythm. I drank lots, changed my position on the bike frequently and tried my utmost to stay as positive as I could be, reminding myself that I could take this discomfort for a few hours, and if I held back slightly, I would be right as rain for the run....

Run - how wrong could I be? I felt absolutely dreadful coming into T2. My legs felt ok to begin with, but my stomach was not co-operating. It was mind over matter time. I broke down the run into three segments in my head, for the three laps. A conservative 1st and 2nd lap would leave me with enough  left in me for the run, I was certain I had it sorted. I learnt I had a lead of eight minutes, which meant I needed to maintain at least 30 seconds per mile on the pace of the second lady. Having raced her (Emilie) a few weeks previously, i knew she was faster than me (she had done a 1 hour 36 to my 1 hour 39 half marathon) but figured that with those figures, I could hold it. Unfortunately, it was not to be, and I crashed magnificently. Nausea crippled me, my legs felt like jelly and I was so dizzy from the discomfort that i had to pull out after nine miles. Emilie passed me shortly afterwards and spurred me to stick with it, but I was toast. Done. Defeated.

Post race I felt pretty damn awful. It's one thing to have to DNF from a race, but to DNF whilst leading? It's absolutely heart breaking. Two days on and i am still not feeling very well, which serves to tell me that i did the right thing pulling out when I did, as there was certainly something amiss in my body. My instinctive reaction was that 'I need my next race, and i need it now', and so I am hoping to do another event this coming weekend, all going well. But I'm giving myself until tomorrow to make my mind up conclusively.

On reflection, I do believe that these difficult experiences serve to make you stronger, even if this wasn't apparent to me at the time. I know now that I can achieve far more than I give myself credit for if i put my mind to it - it should be seen as an achievement for me to have simply run a mile off the bike on Sunday, and I managed 9. That's 1 hour and 15 minutes of grit that I didn't know I had (or stupidity,..).

So yes, here's to good health, a 'settled' stomach and the next challenge....I'm ready for it!

^